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Freelance Design

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This is the upper portion of the CRKT catalog page that was introduced at SHOT Show 2010. There are two models shown with and without half serrated edges.
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This is the lower portion of the CRKT catalog page. There is a little better description here of the knife. While the finished design may seem simple after looking at it for a while, it has a very complex geometry that took me a long time to get the spring profile just right so that you could push the button like a normal lock back and have the front end release like it does and still keep the stress in the steel below its yeild point. I spent a lot of nights just staring at the screen. But, it was well worth the effort. I hope you are able to see the knife and try it out.
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This a basic knife shape that I chose to use to prototype the NIRK spring. I think it looks a little like a Ron Lake knife (one of my Idols). I made the first prototype using SLA. Very cool, but a plastic spring doesn't do much, still, I liked it.
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CRKT 5180 Knife

And here is the final design. The is one of the two models of the NIRK introduced at SHOT Show 2010 with CRKT.
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CRKT 5185 Knife

This is the second of the two models of the NIRK introduced at SHOT Show 2010 with CRKT.
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Here is a close up of the lock mechanism engaging the notch on the knife blade.
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Pretty straight forward; push the button on the back to disengage the lock bar. The bonus is that it didn't cost a fortune to make.
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The images here are of the NIRK (patent pending) which stands for "Nathan's IRreducably complex Knife" (named after my son). You can see why I just call it NIRK for short. Irreducable Complexity is defined as "a single system composed of several well-matched, interacting parts that contribute to the basic function of the system, wherein the removal of any one of the parts causes the system to effectively cease functioning." Every lockback every made has had an approximate minimum of 8-10 parts just to function. If you remove any one of those components, the system will not function unless the function of that removed component is absorbed into another component.

The NIRK is made with 4 parts and could even be made with just two (patent pending). When you get down to two parts, if you remove either one of them, you no longer have a folding knife. This makes the NIRK, the least complex lockback knife ever made. CRKT seems to agree and initial reports are very favorable.